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  • DEADB33F

    DEADB33F

    March 10, 2015, 11:46 am

    A used car dealer is probably the last place to look when getting a used car.

    Their cars will typically all be cars which were part-chopped for newer vehicles indicating straight away that there is potentially some kind of problem with it, why did the previous owner want to get rid of it otherwise?

    You will also pay a fairly hefty premium over buying private.

    The only advantage is that in theory you should have some kind of warranty should anything go seriously wrong within a short period of you owning the vehicle, good luck with getting them to pay out though.

    I've found that the best source for older cars is private sales by older people who are retiring from driving due to ill health/general old age, mainly for the following reasons:

    * They are selling because they genuinely no longer need a car, not because there's something wrong with the one they've got.

    * They tend to come from a time where people respected and looked after their shit, so the car should have been pretty well maintained and looked after.

    * They also come from a time where £20 was a months wages, so offering a few hundred quid for their old car seems like much more than it would to someone of a younger generation, meaning you'll get a better deal.

    * Old people tend to drive slower, this obviously puts less strain on mechanical parts, leading to less wear & tear.

    * Generally they will have owned the car from new, or the car will have very few previous owners. I don't generally view this as a good or a bad thing, just something to bear in mind.

    If you are spending $500-1000 a year in maintenance it means you made a poor buying decision, not that all used cars are shit.

    Reply

  • flyinggnome

    flyinggnome

    March 10, 2015, 6:03 pm

    Once a(n ex)boyfriend playfully threw some wadded up paper at me and it hit my cheek. I immediately burst into tears. It freaked us both out. I think it thought it was going to hit me in the eye. Whatever reason, highly crazy reaction, but he never threw paper at me again.

    I leave Firefox open constantly while my computer's on, with multiple tabs open that I want to revisit later. I hate it when someone else uses my computer and closes Firefox. I've bitched out my husband for doing it and bitched to him when my daughter's done it. It doesn't matter that I have the sites bookmarked, that the same tabs have been up for a month now, or that I have the session manager add-on. Just don't fucking close my browser!

    Reply

  • NotKumar

    NotKumar

    March 10, 2015, 7:42 pm

    I'll take your list and add Starcraft, Quake III (the demo only), Homeworld (only the first), Warcraft III (I still DOTA a little), Team Fortress, and some lesser known Korean such as Gunbound, and Shattered galaxy, games I now see as awful.

    On SNES, I had a blast playing Donkey Kong Country I, Stunt Race FX, Super Mario World, and Yoshi's Island.

    As a kid, I would also take the demo/trial cds from gaming magazines and play the shit out of them. Monster truck madness from Microsoft, anyone? Geeze, you're bringing back all the memories of me vegging out in front of the TV for hours.

    Reply

  • valkyrie123

    valkyrie123

    March 11, 2015, 9:36 am

    If you are using a boiler your problem might not be the faucet. The boiler is not on all the time and only comes on when the water temperature drops to a certain point. When the boiler kicks on the temperature for the outgoing water from the boiler rises quickly. You may be exhausting the hot/warm water supply and kicking on the boiler and getting full hot water.

    Have a plumber install an adjustable tempering valve inline for your faucet. It will automatically mix hot and cold water to achieve the precise temperature you desire for the output. Some of the more expensive faucet have a built in tempering valve but they are usually for showers.

    Reply

  • fliptomato

    fliptomato

    March 10, 2015, 4:28 pm

    Regarding point #2: space is indeed expanding, but particles (and composite particles) do not expand. Thus while the distance between our galaxy and a very distant galaxy might increase, the rulers that we use to measure them (which are made of atoms that are bound together) do *not* increase.

    I guess one analogy that physicists like to use is a loaf bread pudding expanding in the oven. The raisins in the bread pudding are "pulled apart" from one another by the expansion of the loaf, but the raisins themselves do not expand.

    Let me try putting this another way: we can measure universal expansion (e.g. by looking at certain types of supernovae). If *everything* were expanding, including the atoms (and subatomic particles) that make up our galaxy (and us), then we wouldn't be able to measure this expansion since all of our measuring devices would also be scaled up. Thus this is at least a plausibility argument that space expanding via a cosmological constant is different from a scale transformation of the entire system of space and particles.

    So, in the past (but not so far that there weren't galaxies yet) the galaxies/galaxy clusters were closer together, but hydrogen atoms were still the same size.

    Reply

  • Pooh_Bear

    Pooh_Bear

    March 11, 2015, 4:23 am

    From my experience living in Germany, I can say that a majority of Europeans love McDonald's. They seem to like it for the same reasons that many Americans like it, which is that it is fast, cheap, and convenient. I think most of the Europeans who complain about it come from the upper classes, and so don't have to worry about the cost of the food or being in a hurry. In my opinion, however, döners are above and beyond any other kind of fast food. I'm surprised they haven't become big here in the states yet.

    Reply

  • scottklarr

    scottklarr

    March 11, 2015, 12:31 am

    Possible, but not likely. If the government was really interested in disarming people, they would just outright do it and then use martial law to enforce it. Plus, there are already loopholes they could use if they were wanting to disarm in a roundabout way. Such as how convicted felons are not allowed to own guns... all they would have to do is lower the standard of what constitutes as a felony. Hell even the staunch conservatives would jump on board if it involves controlling people's sex lives and abortions.

    Reply

  • glassbreather

    glassbreather

    March 10, 2015, 11:29 am

    She was obviously moving in the right direction of her own volition, she was blocked by those in front of her, the cop assaulted her from behind. She should not have reacted the way she did but you should stop excusing the officer's behavior, it is inexcusable. A clear case of self defense. I'm glad she got it on video. The police do NOT have the right to assault you if you are complying, the same way they do not have the right to shoot a fleeing suspect in the back. Seeing that she was not being arrested at the time of the assault I think this was unnecessary force on the officer's part.

    Reply

  • 2DArray

    2DArray

    March 10, 2015, 5:07 pm

    I was on driving around one night and experienced what is easily the creepiest thing I've ever seen. It starts off with a bit of a cliche, but hear me out.

    I saw two eyes glowing from the side of the road, and, assuming it was a deer walking into my path, immediately slammed on the brakes. I stopped with plenty of room to spare. Turns out it was a dog crossing the street. So there was a dog, crossing the street, and I almost hit it, but didn't. What makes that so bad?

    The dog was downright shit-your-pants creepy. It was clearly a big dog, but it looked completely emaciated. Looked like it hadn't eaten anything in weeks. It walked across the road with a completely hollow determination, like it was walking because it knew it had to, but didn't really understand why. The car nearly crushing it had no effect on its demeanor at all, and the only acknowledgement I received from him was a slow turn of his head. He rolled his head to look up at me, not even slowing his pace, and turned back away.

    The image of that dog really stuck with me for a while. I spent a few weeks wondering if I would see it again, but I never did. I didn't hear anything about any missing dogs. My best guess was that the dog was dying and knew it, and that knowledge had made everything completely irrelevant to it. It was such a perfect personification of that idea...I wonder how long I'll associate death with that dog. It's probably been at least a year now, and the image hasn't faded at all, so maybe it'll be a while.

    Reply

  • RoastBeefOnChimp

    RoastBeefOnChimp

    March 10, 2015, 10:25 pm

    Tony Benn, several times at the pub. He had a friend in my neighborhood in London. Ken Livingstone, before he was mayor. Maya Angelou, in a curry joint down the road along with some fawning literary-agent types. I don't really think much of her books, but she's a hell of a woman in person. She gave my toddler son a kiss. He was fascinated by her bright clothing.

    Met Ian Hunter and Mick Ronson once through a friend. Hunter seemed tired and didn't talk much but Ronson was great. I met Kirk Douglas once, his idiot druggie son Eric went to my college and Kirk was doing a parental visit. Quite low-key and personable, much different than I expected. Very short too.

    I once played in a pick-up band with the drummer from the Surfaris.

    I used to run into Jello Biafra all over the West Coast in the late 70s. That was amusing. He's a quick-witted guy, or at least he was in those days.

    Sat at a table next to Bill Russell in a restaurant in Chicago a few years ago. I had to physically restrain one of the guys I was dining with from going and pestering him about an autograph.

    Best of all, I met Paul Erdős back in the 70s. He gave me shit about my dangly earring and said such luxuries are not befitting of one whose life is dedicated to mathematics. And he was right about that.

    Reply

  • dustingooding

    dustingooding

    March 11, 2015, 12:21 am

    Thanks for the critique. I can't get any better unless folks tell me how!

    Black in front is an interesting idea... Not that there's only darkness in her past, but that there's nothing in front of her to look forward to. I like it.

    My lighting abilities are very limited at this point. I have a light umbrella (which I used here), a bright flashlight and the on-camera flash. I was having a hard time getting all the angles correct with just the umbrella. The gun had to be held just right, her hair had to outline the top of her face, and the bottom of her face lit with actual light...

    But hey, I'm learning. Thanks again!

    Reply

  • Dawn_of_the_deaf

    Dawn_of_the_deaf

    March 11, 2015, 2:24 am

    My little brother started his training term as a police officer right after the academy this February. This was the first story he told us, happened in his first week. It's not horror-movie creepy but hat it been me, it would have left me shaking.

    So that night they had to deal with a call from a worried mother and father because his son wouldn't open the door (he was living in the apartment right above theirs). So my brother was the first to enter the place. The boy, 25 years old, was lying dead in the middle of the room floor on a huge blood puddle. He had cut his own throat with a knife. With his finger and using his own blood he had written on the floor "I'm sorry...". Had he changed his mind at the last moment, when it was too late, we won't know. My brother received the order "take notes of everything you see" so he was left in the apartment alone with the body until the judge arrived. My brother is tall and hefty, not the kind of guy you expect to get home that day to call my mum and cry like a baby.

    Reply

  • nukeleearr

    nukeleearr

    March 10, 2015, 11:16 am

    I don't think he's arguing for insider trading but more about making organizations more transparent with more information available to the public which leads to more efficient markets... which I believe is also a good thing because insider trading is going to happen and there's nothing the SEC can do about it except catch a few idiots (martha stewart) every now and then.

    edit: by adding transparency to the markets, not only does it decrease insider trading, but also as I said makes markets more efficient and also decreases some companies competitive edge which means more innovation

    Reply

  • UnificationDotCom

    UnificationDotCom

    March 11, 2015, 2:14 am

    This sounds like a good thing to talk with her about. She may be more likely to incorporate you into the conversation if she knows that you're silently feeling uncomfortable. Some people feel comfortable by just observing and witnessing what is unfolding. If you don't, you can talk to her about it. Also, you have to take responsibility for entering a conversation by asking questions if it's stuff you dont' know about. Then you'll know more over time, and understand more of the context. That's normal when getting to know a knew group of people.

    Reply

  • the_nuclear_lobby

    the_nuclear_lobby

    March 10, 2015, 3:18 pm

    >you ignore the claim concerning the distinction between modification and withdrawal under the 1969 Vienna Convention.

    The Vienna Convention specifically _doesn't_ apply to agreements between states and international organizations (so the IAEA subsidiary agreement with Iran is excluded). From your link:

    >__The scope of the Convention is limited. It applies only to treaties concluded between states, so it does not cover agreements between states and international organizations__ or between international organizations themselves

    There may be another legal provision in some other international convention that allows partial withdrawals of states from agreements with international agencies like Iran wants, but it isn't in the Vienna Convention.

    Also, that Iran has never cited such a right of withdrawal specifically under any convention implies that this right is likely not delineated.

    >Each of your arguments addresses modification, but none addresses withdrawal.

    Withdrawal from a section of a legal document without providing legal justification is equivalent to unilateral modification.

    >So the argument appears to be that 1) NNPT allows withdrawal.

    Yes.

    >2) Vienna allows partial withdrawal under those conditions above, which appear to be satisfied.

    No - Vienna specifically doesn't apply to agreements between Iran and the IAEA.

    >3) Iran has the right to partially withdraw.

    They have only claimed this right vaguely (which implies they know this isn't a truly legal right), and it has been repeatedly denied as being legal by the IAEA and permanent UN Security Council members.

    ----

    >Iran also seems to be using the argument that it never ratified the extra provisions, merely signed them. You and I might consider this bullshit, but it is the same "Ha, Ha, we didn't ratify it!" reasoning the US uses to defend its claimed right to drop the Test Ban Treaty when it feels like it.

    I agree the US reasoning is bogus as well.

    Even if we don't agree whether Iran is in violation of the letter of the law on this one issue, we can probably agree they have been so in the recent past as well as having violated the spirit of the agreement for years.

    In the context of what happens next, I'm not sure it matters at this point what the lawyers figure out.

    Thanks for the good discussion.

    Reply

  • pemboa

    pemboa

    March 10, 2015, 8:21 am

    Well I like OO.org

    > OO is horrible and cluttered

    I personally use it with no toolbars, so it's not cluttered.

    > MS Office 2007 rocks big time

    It would be nice if you at least acknowledged that that is subjective

    > Anyone that doesn't like the new 2007 interface, probably hasn't spent more than 10 minutes understanding it

    Well, I see you've elected yourself overseer of what is good and what is not. I prefer OO.org interface thank you. But to strengthen your point, I've never used Word heavily, and everytime I do touch it, I do not like it.

    Reply

  • Daishiman

    Daishiman

    March 10, 2015, 9:12 am

    Yes, as of now telecoms have preferential treatment, and to date no libertarian has shown that "smaller" governments would be unwilling to do the same.

    Your contention that telecoms do not need government intervention is naive and clearly shows your ignorance on the industry. Telecoms are essentially possible because the government has made way for them; there is no way any enterprise could build a network buying rights from every proprety owner a line passes through. The problem today in the US is that carriers have exclusive rights to the lines they have, creating a situation of local oligopolies. Other, more enlightened nations have forced carriers to permit traffic from services that sub-lease, allowing for a much more diverse market and forcing competition from smaller, nimbler providers.

    And btw, the reason local oligopolies in telecoms occur is because the few large providers force towns into exclusivity contracts because of the cost of laying down cabling to provide for them. If state governments were a bit smarter they would fund the installation of dark fiber and lease it to providers so that they would compete on quality of service and network utilization. In the countries with the highest bandwidth that is the case.

    I'm going to discontinue this conversation because you have shown complete ignorance of the industries that I have mentioned, and have only cited basic economic theory with no regards to the actual situations of those markets. Perhaps when you can come up with more convincing arguments backed up by a significant body of scientific research and study I'll give any importance to your position.

    Reply

  • decemberain27

    decemberain27

    March 11, 2015, 3:36 am

    Just because the wart is removed doesn't mean the HPV or risk of passing it on to anyone is gone.

    You have to tell her. I have HPV and didn't know until I was one step away from cervical cancer. There are very few symptoms for guys, but for women, the symptoms can lead to cancer, infirtility, warts,etc. I had surgery three times to remove the HPV cells from my cervix. (This was all prior to the Gardasil vaccine, which as someone mentioned above, only combats 4 out of a possible 100 or so types of strains). Especially if she is a virgin, to pass this on to her unknowingly is really fucked up.

    While it will be a rough convo to have, you should tell her and maybe have her make an appointment with her OBGYN to talk about what is best in terms of protection. It is completely possible to have a normal sex life but you have to be honest about things...as embarassing as it may be. I know if I were a virgin and my BF gave me HPV, I'd be PISSED.

    Reply

  • eminence

    eminence

    March 10, 2015, 10:46 pm

    every one should be in favor of some kind of "gun control", it's just the level that matters. the government regulates ("controls", if you will) plenty of other things, and we don't mind. the trick is to find the right level of control so that we don't mind gun control either.

    my view: i don't want crazy serial killers, or otherwise unstable persons acquiring or carrying firearms. if that means that law-abiding citizens have to jump through a few hoops if they want to own and carry firearms, than so be it

    Reply

  • cultured_banana_slug

    cultured_banana_slug

    March 10, 2015, 3:54 pm

    I always find it rather telling that they're happy to stand around shouting and waiving signs, but when it comes to putting their money where their "morals" are, they're suddenly bankrupt. Why aren't they for free childcare services and health care for kids? Why not offer to pay the women $20k (generic rate for a surrogate) not to have an abortion? Why expect her to go through the trouble of a pregnancy she doesn't even want, without any compensation?

    But nope. Easier to scream at people and feel good about yourself. That, and I honestly think there's a segment of the population that just enjoys being pissed off and frothing at the mouth all the time.

    Reply

  • elsoothsayer

    elsoothsayer

    March 11, 2015, 5:11 am

    Two stories, two different kinds of creepy.

    First story: When I was younger (~7 or 8yrs), my brother was sleeping on the couch in the living room and around 2am starts screaming his fucking head off. My mom, dad, and I all rush in to see what he's screaming about. "THEY'RE COMING TO GET ME THEY'RE COMING TO GET ME!" he screams.

    "What? Who is?" we ask.

    He points in the far corner and says, "the men in the black suits." We drove him to the hospital, all the while he is whispering to me that the men are still there.

    Turns out he was pretty sick.

    Story two:

    This story was relayed to me by a cop who was chatting with a coworker and I (we were doing work related stuff on on the campus of a major university) about a couple of recent arrests. One of the guys he had caught had been running nude around campus and masturbating in front of the windows while students were in class. Same guy also used to drive past sorority houses naked and jerking it. He would then call to the girls over to his car so they could see.

    Fucking perverts are hilarious.

    Reply

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